Martini And More

“Jumping into something without knowing what you’re going to do always leads to growth”, says Jivraj Singh, Musician

“Jumping into something without knowing what you’re going to do always leads to growth”, says Jivraj Singh, Musician

Meet Jivraj Singh whose foot tapping beats are made the way up the ladder as the Drummer of Skinny Alley and Pink Noise. 

One of 60 participants at 2011’s Red Bull Music Academy in Madrid, Jivraj recorded with Rhye’s Robin Hannibal; long-time David Bowie producer Tony Visconti; and performed live at a lecture with Bootsy Collins. Whether he’s playing percussion, electronics, objects, software or dropped into a situation with nothing at all, Jivraj sounds like himself. Join him as he talks about the beats that make a difference.

Highlights of the Episode

  • Listening to the excellent mixtapes which were completely genre agnostic.
  • Music by Miles Davis, Steely Dan, Quincy Jones, played an important role he says.
  • Being an artist is numero uno, everything else just falls into place thereafter.

Quotes and Takeaways

  • “Music needs to be honest, and then all that’s left if to connect with the audience”
  • “My hope is that my personality comes through regardless of the medium.”
  • “Jumping into something without knowing what you’re going to do always leads to growth. 

What were you musical experiences which you retrace back to childhood?

My parents have played music together since the 1970s. I grew up with the experience of their bands writing, rehearsing, and touring. I was much keener to hang out with the band than with my friends at school.
 

 

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Were you influenced by any old record and tapes? If so which ones?

My dad used to make excellent mixtapes which were completely genre-agnostic. There was Miles Davis, Steely Dan, Quincy Jones, lots of classic disco, Weather Report, you name it.
 

 

According to you, what constitutes a good performance for a live audience? How do you decide on opening a phase of your set?

The music needs to be honest, to begin with. After that the only thing that matters is connecting with the audience. How you do it depends on the music, the venue, and your creative intentions.

 

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Can you take us through the process of how you prepare for your gigs?

Many days of rehearsal, discussion, building the tools needed to effectively communicate the sound (and with PINKNOISE, visuals). I also stay in shape because I’m a very physical performer. Not to mention that I usually have to pack up more gear than anyone else on stage.
 

 

People say more than you being a drummer or a percussion player, you are a beat maker. What is your opinion?

Being an artist is what is important for me, whether I’m playing drums, electronics, software or making visuals. My hope is that my personality comes through regardless of the medium.
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Can you tell us about your experience with Sound Thief and the making of it?

It was interesting to try something different (for me). Jumping into something without knowing what you’re going to do always leads to growth. The main takeaway is my personal and professional relationship with Autorickshaw Productions.

 

What is your message for musicians? 

Have no fear, and even if you do find the courage to take the leap and do what makes you happy.

 

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